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2012 Ideas

"Bring Happiness Home" - PepsiCo - China

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"Bring Happiness Home" - PepsiCo - China

Chinese New Year is an extremely competitive period for FMCG brands pursuing their slice of the Chinese consumer pie. PepsiCo’s three flag-ship brands - Pepsi, Tropicana and Lays – are known collectively by the Chinese word for “Happinessâ€. Their 2012 campaign, named “Bring Happiness Home†sought to reverse the trend of young Chinese people dreading, instead of embracing, the idea of going home for the holiday period. Designed to pull on the heart-strings of the younger generation, and play on the guilt-factor from neglecting their parents, PepsiCo skilfully produced a ten-minute trailer to be broadcasted in Chinese cinemas. We watch a lonely father preparing for another lonely new year whilst his dynamic and successful children (all played by high-profile Chinese movie starts) are too busy to visit. With the help of mysterious unknown man, however, the children all turn up and the family are reunited. Corny? Most definitely. But also incredibly effective: the video was viewed a staggering 700 million times online and created US$2.8 million worth of media coverage.

"Cheers for You Project" - Ariel - Japan

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"Cheers for You Project" - Ariel - Japan

In the wake of the 2011 Japanese disaster, hundreds of thousands of victims were left without access to washed clothing. In what was not an advertising campaign, Ariel stepped in to provide aid until normality in the region resumed. A purpose built laundry centre was installed in the disaster region, and over 6 months washed, dried and folded nearly 5,000 loads of laundry, including 22,000 clothing items. This project repaid Ariel’s customers’ for their loyalty and support – and provided disaster victims a sense of comfort, cleanliness and hope. Tangible results were recognised for the brand too; unpaid media exposure – through online and TV publicity - was equivalent to US$4.3 million, not to mention a 168% increase in sales of P&G products compared to the same period one year earlier.

"Pinball Skatepark" Mountain Dew - New Zealand

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"Pinball Skatepark" Mountain Dew - New Zealand

Mountain Dew, despite being a global brand, had always struggled in New Zealand. In advance of launching 3 new flavour variants, the brand was in poor shape with less than one third of young New Zealanders saying they would consider the drink. So, against this backdrop and with aggressive sales targets, what could be done to revitalise this flailing brand? Well, something beyond the “Do the Dew†campaign - embodying the “get out there†and “push boundaries†philosophy behind the brand - because, quite frankly, New Zealanders didn’t buy it. Market research found that consumers had rejected this approach on the grounds that it wasn’t authentic. Mountain Dew had to create something to appeal to the target market and bring the philosophy to life, something real. The solution: a fully functioning giant pinball machine that enabled skaters and BMX bike riders to become human pinballs. The Skatepark brought Mountain Dew global media attention and the instant adoration of young New Zealanders. Trial and repeat purchase figures all surpassed the ambitious targets, finally making Mountain Dew a true commercial success in New Zealand.

"The Man Your Man Could Smell Like: Response" - Old Spice - USA

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"The Man Your Man Could Smell Like: Response" - Old Spice - USA

The body wash category has consistently expanded over the years, eventually eclipsing sales of bar soap. Launched in 2003, Old Spice is considered to be one of the “founding fathers†in the male category, however in 2010 sales slumped in the face of fierce competition - most notably Unilever’s mighty Dove – who launched their Men+Care range which appealed to the loyal female consumer buying for their male partner. Fortunately, in 2011 Old Spice retaliated with an iconic advertising campaign “The Man Your Man Could Smell Likeâ€, fuelling unprecedented levels of on and offline buzz, especially - and crucially - amongst females. The next question was how to respond to this phenomenon? A continuation of the theme was a certainty, but how to encourage more dialogue about male body wash between men and women, this time on a deeper and more experiential level? The “Response†campaign sought to do just this. Old Spice created an interactive experience in which “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like†personally responded to his fans on the internet in real time. The innovative idea not only changed the way brands interact with the web and became one of the largest and fastest-growing interactive campaigns in history (it’s first day online views exceeded those for Obama’s Presidential acceptance speech), but it also helped Old Spice to increase unit sales of body wash by 125%, solidifying the brand as the number-one body wash brand for men.

"Born on Fire" - Fiat - USA

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"Born on Fire" - Fiat - USA

Chrysler was a high profile victim of the 2008 financial crash, requiring a humiliating combined bailout package from the US Government and new part-owners Fiat. In this process, the brand lost much of its credibility and come 2011, with a range of 16 new product designs, consumer loyalty was at an all time low. The challenge was huge. Chrysler had one chance to tell their comeback story, a two minute advert during the 2011 Super Bowl. The message had to keep the public’s eye on Chrysler’s future, not the past; to see the possibility, the energy and their will to win. The ad focused on Chrysler, Detroit and Eminem: 3 strong, iconic American symbols, each emerging from a turbulent last decade. The ad adopted a hard-hitting, honest tone and pays homage to the hard-working employees at Chrysler. Yes, they may have been “to hell and back†but “the hottest fire makes the hardest steelâ€. Chrysler is a brand which still understands luxury. Amongst six other car ads, mostly of a light hearted and “jokey†nature, this stood out. The American public were captivated and pride in buying American was re-instilled into the wounded motor industry. A PR extravaganza ensued and sales rose considerably, putting Chrysler well and truly back on track.

"Watermark" - Bundaberg Rum - Australia

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"Watermark" - Bundaberg Rum - Australia

The Watermark story is another example of how a brand can raise the spirits of its consumers in times of adversity, whilst also making meaningful contributions towards a recovery. When Queensland Australia was devastated by floods in December 2010, the economy of a region the size of France ground to a halt. The local flagship brand, Bundaberg Rum – or Bundy as it’s known – was no exception: the distillery was flooded for several days, employees were left homeless, loyal customers penniless. The brand, synonymous with Queensland for 110 years, was on its knees. Such a grave situation was unparalleled, but the brand rallied and a creative response was at hand. The idea was called Watermark, a specially created 5 year rum and a cultural symbol of resilience and recovery. As a product, its proceeds became a significant revenue stream for charity. As a brand idea, it became a powerful platform to raise the spirits of Queenslanders through promotional activity and a series of benefit concerts. Watermark helped Queensland and Bundy get back on their feet. Bundy was able to contribute over $935,000 from Watermark profits into the reconstruction of Queensland. The brand was mentioned in the media 7.1 million times, in a region with a population of 4.5 million. Additionally, consumption rose while key competitors such as Jack Daniels and Jim Beam declined.

"The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" - POM Wonderful - USA

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"The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" - POM Wonderful - USA

POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold is a documentary by Morgan Spurlock (the creator of Supersize Me) about branding, advertising and product placement - financed by brands, advertising and product placement. This off-the-wall idea was intended to give viewers the chance to interact with their brands, and gain a unique and genuine insight into the world of advertising and product placement. Unlike previous documentaries of this kind, this time the brands were in on the joke and an essential part of the narrative. POM Wonderful was one of 22 brands covered by the documentary. In the documentary the marketing bosses at POM Wonderful are seen negotiating the sponsorship of the film, paying US$1million for the rights. The other brands features including JetBlue and Hyatt Hotels negotiate similar deals such as product placement and sponsorship deals. The brand and product exposure generated by the film was immense. 6 weeks after the film had been announced, it had already achieved more than 900 million media impressions. This rose to 5 billion by the time the film had finished airing across every state in the US and 10 countries internationally. Most importantly, consumers gained new respect for the brands featured, considering them as ‘cool’ and ‘accessible’ and innovative thought-leaders in their respective categories.

"You're Not You When You're Hungry" - Snickers - UK

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"You're Not You When You're Hungry" - Snickers - UK

In order to maintain its position as the world's largest chocolate bar, Snickers have always adopted a decentralised branding strategy in order to build a global brand which still appeals directly to its consumer base. The You're Not You When You're Hungry campaign is a perfect example of this 'Think Big, Act Small' approach. The universal story of the hungry man becoming irritable and grumpy (i.e. a “Divaâ€) until he has had his Snickers was applied to all regions but was adapted in script, cast and context to suit each market. In the UK we see a disgruntled and sarcastic Joan Collins moaning at football team-mates, before being handed Snickers and returning to his normal self. Adverts in the US, China and other major markets casted local celebrities – such as Liza Minnelli - into the Diva role and adopted regionalised humour and references. This local flavour really got people talking about the brand and lead Snickers to its most successful period of growth, sales up 15.9% and leading the 56 out of 58 markets in which the campaign was run.

"Voice Search Outdoor" - Google - UK

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"Voice Search Outdoor" - Google - UK

Google were wishing to launch their new “voice search†technology, enabling users to use voice commands to search the web when on the move or in a hurry. The brief was not only to promote the London launch, but also to bring some wit and warmth into the brand; as research had found that, despite being omnipresent in all our lives, the brand was still perceived as distant. The idea was to use the world’s oldest medium like the newest: a traditional poster campaign, but using the power of Google Street View to be preview all 150 poster sites and identify institutions and attractions in the immediate environ. From this, a database was compiled and used to for the creative execution of a series bespoke posters, each with copy relating the precise point at which the consumer would be when reading the ad. The billboards were certainly attention-grabbing, due to their minimalistic design and the fact they appeared to be gobbledygook plastered across the wall. The phonetic spelling meant onlookers would dwell on each ad and say the words out loud – exactly as if using the “voice search†tool. Furthermore, the interactive element brought fun into the process, giving Google the desired image of being warm and witty. This was the most complex outdoor campaign ever in the UK, but the results justified the effort. Campaign recognition was three times the average; it was discussed by over 750,000 people; and doubled the use of “voice searchâ€.

"The Code" - Columbian Military - Columbia

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"The Code" - Columbian Military - Columbia

Columbia's armed conflicts have lead to dozens of kidnappings, including military personnel and police officers, by the Revolutionaries (known as FARC). Some have been held for as long as 12 years, and are only exposed to the media as allowed by the FARC. So how could the Columbian military communicate with these hostages to preserve hope and morale, and assure them they had not been forgotten? Radio was the only known and feasible means but a direct message would surely be censored. Instead a song was devised, containing subtle military language and messages of support. 19 people saved, you're next, don't lose hope was translated into Morse Code and disguised as a the bass line of a catchy chorus. The terrorists were fooled and the message reached the kidnapped men across over 100 Columbian radio stations.

"A New Warrior" - Greenpeace - UK

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"A New Warrior" - Greenpeace - UK

A key force in Greenpeace's mission to protect the planet has always been the trusty “Rainbow Warrior†ship. Since 1978 it had survived raids and even bomb attacks to aid Greenpeace protests at sea and shut down illegal disruptive fishing operations. However, come 2011, the ship had run its course and had to be retired. But funds at the charity were tight and a shortfall of over $1 million stood in the way of constructing a replacement. A marketing strategy was required to reach out to donors. The solution was to offer people the opportunity to purchase and own part of the new ship, by setting up an e-commerce website. More than 400,000 items were for sale, prices ranging from 1 Euro to 7,000 Euros. In exchange the new owner would receive a certificate of ownership. Proud owners instantly shared their certificates online and the buzz spread like wildfire. The media responded and directed almost 2 million visitors from over 171 countries to the site. Eventually on the 14th October 2011, thanks to the 1,256,122 Euros raised, the new Rainbow Warrior was constructed and sent to sea to carry on where her legendary predecessor had left off.

"Fashion Shoot" - Ariel - Sweden

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"Fashion Shoot" - Ariel - Sweden

The challenge for Ariel was to engage their consumers in what is a notoriously low engagement category. How exactly do you encourage the target (35 year old plus woman) to get online and discuss, blog and interact about laundry? The Ariel Fashion Shoot aimed to do just this by setting up a live product demo / gaming experience, situated in the Stockholm Central Station and connected to the whole of Scandinavia via facebook. Users were invited to “Aim, Stain and Win†by remotely controlling a robot-gun and shooting at designer clothing with their choice of chocolate sauce, Lingonberry Jam or tomato ketchup. The stain-ridden clothes were then washed live in public and distributed to winning shooters from the facebook site, as well as a number of high profile female bloggers and celebrities. The event was quick to go viral with over 1,000 proud winners boasting of their success to online friends and family, encouraging total facebook participation of 25,000. With support from celebrities, bloggers and use of a TV ad – the media reach from the campaign exceeded 5 million, 20% of Scandinavia’s entire population. Through this campaign Ariel had demonstrated its impressive stain removal qualities, whilst also bringing an element of much-needed fun into the product category.

"FAKE IT ALL" - Brand Protection Group - UAE

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"FAKE IT ALL" - Brand Protection Group - UAE

Counterfeiting has long been a problem in Lebanon: a result of decades of war, instability and poorly controlled borders. Until recently there has been no effectual regulatory body in place to spread awareness of this issue and to handle and investigate complaints. With the installation of the Brand Protection Group (BPG) there was fresh hope that progress could be made. However, their public profile was low. Leo Burnett were tasks with raising public awareness and driving more traffic to their counterfeit goods hotline. An integrated approach was devised, using traditional and social media to reach as much of the population as possible, culminating on International Anti-Counterfeit Day on 15th March. A TV ad featuring a husband speaking of how much he misses his mother-in-law and urging his wife to arrange a visit introduced the concept that “look harder, even the closest things to you can be fakeâ€. The concept was continued in the national newspaper, where the front page logo was subtly faked for a day to gauge how many readers would notice. Few did, and their attention was drawn to this the next day. Other stunts were pulled such as replacing the iconic national talk-show host with a lookalike, and the faking of leading bloggers and leading Lebanese influencers’ facebook pages. These high profile stunts started to get the public’s attention and there was an outcry for the faking to end. Proof that the objectives had been met: 92% of the country’s population had been reached, with the BPG’s hotline experiencing an 850% increase in call levels.

"The Long Wait" - John Lewis - UK

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"The Long Wait" - John Lewis - UK

The recent years of economic downturn has driven many retailers to focus their campaigns solely on the financial benefits of buying from them. Not John Lewis, whose recent TV ads reminded us all of the importance of emotional engagement in building brand values and, subsequently, brand loyalty. The Long Wait was a runaway success over the 2011 Christmas period and substituted BOGOF offers and half price deals for a beautifully crafted and highly emotive short film. In this film we see a young boy impatiently counting down the days to Christmas. When the day finally arrives, he runs past his pile of presents to give his own gift to his parents, carrying on from their equally emotive 2010 campaign emphasising John Lewis as the home of “thoughtful gifting†at Christmas. This ad was widely praised and hailed as a trend-setter with other major brands also moving to bring home the “familyâ€, “love†and “security†themes. With news dominated by credit crunches and financial austerity measures, consumers now yearn to feel comforted by brands that support their lifestyle and make them feel good about themselves. John Lewis were rewarded for this clever strategy; with strong growth throughout 2011 and improved market share. Consumers will await their 2012 campaign with another box of tissues at the ready.

"Meet Our People" - McDonalds - UK

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"Meet Our People" - McDonalds - UK

The age old perception that McDonald's employees are the lowest of the low was a cause for concern for the fast food giant. It was resulting in a lack of engagement between staff and customers. Having successfully rebuilt public confidence in their menu, it was now time to do the same for their employees. The Meet our People campaign challenged public perceptions that McDonald's employed only unskilled and uneducated individuals into dead-end jobs. The employees were the stars of the campaign, which included posters aiming to show their human side. They are seen outwith the context of the restaurant, away from the unflattering uniforms and greasy fryers, reminding us they have lives which may include further education or career prospects in management. Additionally, a competition was run to find the face of the campaign to feature in a short film confronting the public about their negative perceptions, and supported by a broadsheet press and digital campaign. The film was a YouTube hit and lead to a 47% increase in visits to the McDonald's People website, showing the public were taking notice and reconsidering their assumptions about those on the other side of the till.

"Good Call" - Fosters - UK

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"Good Call" - Fosters - UK

The ad agency Adam & Eve certainly had their work cut out when briefed by Heineken to revitalise the struggling Fosters brand. Consumers had become confused by the incoherent brand identity, bored of the outdated packaging and disengaged by the irrelevant “No Worries†tagline. An advertising campaign was required that would appeal to the 18-34 year old male drinker, living for the weekend and facing the usual social dilemmas of moving on, settling down and dealing with irksome mates. The resultant campaign successfully clarified the blurred Australian identity by linking the laid back Ozzie lifestyle to the down-to-earth reality of life in the UK. The ads featured a long distance call to the agony uncles, Brad and Dan, who confidently provided assured, yet comically blasé, advice to the British drinker who would agree with their “Good Callâ€. The amusing tone of the ads strengthened Fosters comedy status, and refreshed the “No Worries†tagline with the more pertinent “Good Callâ€. The brand has now been successfully overhauled and enjoys a much more comfortable market position.

"Reclaim Your Space" - Bajaj Exhaust Fans - India

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"Reclaim Your Space" - Bajaj Exhaust Fans - India

Leo Burnett India created this crafty campaign for Bajaj Exhaust Fans, a range of household fans that allow you to reclaim your space from foul odours. Incredibly, the posters in this campaign were constructed entirely with real cigarettes, fish and socks; with no requirement for photo-shopping or computer generated effects. The message is clear: a bad odour can destroy your personal space and deprive you of your home comforts. The campaign won acclaim in the Asian AdFest awards as well as in New York and has caught the attention of art and design critics around the world. This unpaid for media attention has been commercially beneficial to the client; bringing an increase in sales and significantly raising their brand profile.

"The Invisible Drive" - Mercedes-Benz - Germany

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"The Invisible Drive" - Mercedes-Benz - Germany

The first ever hydrogen-powered car, the Mercedes-Benz F-CELL is invisible to the environment. The paradoxical challenge was to convey this to the consumer by allowing them to experience the car in the same way the environment does, i.e. as if it were non-existent! This was achieved by cleverly fitting LED mats to one side of the car and an all-capturing camera to the other, thus transferring images from behind the car onto the mats and giving the impression that the car is invisible. Needless to say, this caused a real stir and captured the imagination of passersby in the vicinity. Before long, F-CELL was an online sensation and the most talked about car via social media.

"Sorry About the Twigs, Folks" - Monteiths - New Zealand

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"Sorry About the Twigs, Folks" - Monteiths - New Zealand

Monteiths are proud of the fact their Cider contains freshly crushed apples and pears; this a not from concentrate quality is a key point of difference and, in such a rapidly growing and competitive cider market, one which they are desperately keen to own. To reinforce this point of difference, and bring it to the forefront of their customer's attention, real twigs were slipped into the packaging of the Crushed Apple and Crushed Pear cider 12 packs before being distributed to liquor shops and supermarkets. Of course, what ensued was a barrage of complaints and public confusion. Public interest soared; media interest reached 50 times what could be afforded on budget. At its peak, Monteith's issued a carefully crafted apology across newspapers, billboards, online banners and on-pack stickers. This apology was, in fact, the perfect platform to spread the simple message: the fruit in Monteiths cider comes from a tree, not out of a can.

"Romanians are Smart" - McCann Erickson - Romania

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"Romanians are Smart" - McCann Erickson - Romania

Following on from the prior year campaign, which blasted the Romaniana's Ego by temporarily rebranding their iconic, national chocolate bar as an “American ROMâ€, McCann Erickson sought to continue the theme of rebuilding the Romanian’s once-dwindling national pride. This year, the campaign centred on the National Day of Romania; traditionally regarded as nothing more than a dull day of predictable political speeches, and desperately needing an injection of patriotism. McCann Erickson got to work and their online researchers soon came upon a sad and worrying discovery. When searching online for “Romanians are...†the automated suggestions were offensive to even the most indifferent Romanian, namely “...stupid, ugly, scum, vampiresâ€! This simply had to change, and before the National Day of Romania! Rom reacted by transforming its website as a base to help users reverse the trend and generate positive results. The site quickly reached 600,000 hits and generated 6 hours of TV coverage. Major national bloggers and celebrities spread the word and before long a full national campaign was underway. Users were urged to search for “Romanians are smartâ€, which eventually became the most searched phrase, thus appearing as automatic suggestion on Google, Yahoo and Youtube. National pride was, once again, restored. Sales continued to rise, 20% as a result of this campaign, and market share grew by an impressive 8%.

"Return of Dictator Ben Ali" - Tunisia

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"Return of Dictator Ben Ali" - Tunisia

Emerging from the “Arab Spring†as a newly democratic nation, a reinvigorated Tunisia was preparing for its first ever free elections. Surprisingly, however, voting numbers were forecasted to be disappointingly low. After such a long struggle to overthrow the prior dictatorship, only 55% of Tunisians actually intended to exercise their democratic right to vote! Standard promotional strategies were bound to fail in increasing this figure; with over 1,600 candidates running and countless political messages being bombarded through the media, would-be voters were becoming disillusioned and confused. A simple message was required: bold and provocative and able to break through the clutter of political advertising. What resulted was precisely that: a stunt and showed everyone that if they didn't vote, their Revolution was in vain. A few days before polling, a billboard sized poster of the previous dictator, Ben Ali, was displayed in a busy city centre location. The reaction, as expected, was explosive. Enraged on-lookers swiftly tore down the poster only to reveal another poster underneath: “BEWARE, DICTATORSHIP CAN RETURN. ON OCTOBER 23RD, VOTE.†The events were filmed and instantly went viral. It was the leading news story of the day and the buzz carried the powerful message across the nation. Ultimately the strategy had its desired effect, with 88% voter turn-out, and a great improvement on the original forecast.

"Cricket Stars" - Sprite - UAE

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"Cricket Stars" - Sprite - UAE

The growth and expansion of the UAE economy is largely built on the hard work of their 250,000 labourers; mostly from India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Sprite recognised these men often work long hours in difficult conditions and aimed to publically reward them for this. The idea: to bring the men together with the passion they all shared – cricket. A tournament was set up, based on the World Cup format, which turned the humble construction workers into cricket stars. Over six months, trials were held then group stages then play-offs and finally the tournament final at the 25,000-seater Dubai International Cricket Stadium. Sprite was able to position itself as the perfect accompaniment to a demanding game of cricket under the punishing sun. Overall 42,000 workers from labour camps participated before the lucky finalists were enabled to live out their dream in front of a packed stadium. Just reward for some of the hardest working people in the world.